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Electronic music / Folk & Country

Makoto Moroi - Spacephonic Music For Japanese Traditional Instruments album mp3

Makoto Moroi - Spacephonic Music For Japanese Traditional Instruments album mp3

Performer: Makoto Moroi
Title: Spacephonic Music For Japanese Traditional Instruments
Style: Abstract, Experimental
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 919
Other formats: MP4 MP2 VOX AU MP1 TTA XM

From the insert: "Makoto Moroi, a famous japanese composer with rare talent, is engaged on applying the stereophonic space created by 4-channel system as a new medium to express his musical world. Two pieces recorded on this disc present Moroi's space music based on japanese national instruments. 1. Sinfonia "SHIN" (Elongation) for .

Makoto Moroi (諸井 誠 Moroi Makoto) (17 December 1930 – 2 September 2013) was a Japanese composer. Makoto Moroi was born in Tokyo, and is the son of Saburō Moroi. He studied composition with Tomojirō Ikenouchi at the Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music, graduating in 1952. He also studied Gregorian chant privately with Paul Anouilh, and Renaissance and Baroque music with Eta Harich-Schneider

Makoto Moroi - Music For Shakuhachi. Saburo Moroi, Various - Saburo Moroi Und Seine Schule. Makoto Moroi - Concertos by Makoto Moroi. Masaaki Hayakawa, Makoto Moroi, Hōzan Yamamoto - Requiem Santi, Chikurai. Makoto Moroi, Kuniharu Akiyama - Music Drama Akai Mayu. Makoto Moroi + Koubou Abe - Music Drama Akai Mayu. Toru Takemitsu, Michio Mamiya, Masao Matsumoto - The Sound Of Japan. Various - Hibiki - Contemporary music for japanese traditional instruments. Makoto Moroi, Kuniharu Akiyama - Music Drama Akai Mayu

Traditional Japanese musical instruments are musical instruments used in the traditional and folk music of Japan. They comprise a range of string, wind, and percussion instruments. Bin-sasara (編木, 板ささら; also spelled bin-zasara) - clapper made from wooden slats connected by a rope or cord. Hyōshigi (拍子木) - wooden or bamboo clappers. Den-den daiko (でんでん太鼓) - pellet drum, used as a children's toy. Ikko - small, ornately decorated hourglass-shaped drum.

One of the pioneers of Japanese electronic music, Makoto Moroi, composed "Kusabira" for Kyogen (traditional comedy theater) with electronic sound in 1964. Kusabira" means "mushroom. A strolling Buddhist monk, Yamabushi, tried to exterminate many mushrooms that grew in the garden of a man's home. This is Moroi's most important work using Japanese traditional instruments. The origin of this work was based on Arving Toffler's 1970 book Future Shock, and it was composed as spacephonic music by a 4-channel recording system. This is committed work by the young genius player Susumu Miyashita, who plays various kinds of koto, gongs, percussion and Indian flute bansuries. The sharpness of the performance is so wonderful, and also some transformed human voices are inserted in the middle part of this work.

Makoto Moroi was a Japanese composer. He also studied Gregorian chant privately with Paul Anouilh, and Renaissance and Baroque music with Eta Harich-Schneider. He was one of the leading composers who introduced Japanese audiences to new musical styles and devices, including twelve-tone technique, serialism, and aleatory music (Kanazawa 2001)

Listen to music from Makoto Moroi like Chikurai Gosho and F2 - Shosanke. Find the latest tracks, albums, and images from Makoto Moroi. A pupil of Ikenouchi, he worked at the electronic music studio in Cologne (1955-6) and returned to take a leading part in the Japanese avant garde, as composer and as teacher (from 1968 at the Osaka Geijutsu Daigaku). Many of his works, in most genres, use Japanese instruments (. Five Pieces for shakuhachi, 1964).

Spacephonic Music For Japanese Traditional Instruments. Tape Works Of Kuniharu Akiyama 1. Music Drama Akai Mayu. Music For Puppet Theatre Of Hitomi-Za. Please note! This page content is based on beta engine. Thank you for understanding. Your report has been successfully sent.

Tracklist Hide Credits

A Sinfonia Shin For S.M. (Beggining)
Koto, Percussion, Bansuri – Susumu Miyashita
B1 Sinfonia Shin For S.M. (Conclusion)
Koto, Percussion, Bansuri – Susumu Miyashita
B2 Trio Uitenpen
Drums [Tsuzumi], Performer [Oukawa], Taiko [Shime-taiko], Percussion – Roetsu ToushaKoto – Susumu MiyashitaShakuhachi – Chikuho Sokai

Credits

  • Composed By – Makoto Moroi
  • Design – Mitsuo Katsui
  • Engineer – Heizo Yoda
  • Producer – Noritsune Matsumoto
  • Recording Supervisor [Recording Director] – Shohachiro Aizawa*

Notes

CD-4 Quadradisc Discrete 4 channel stereo.

Comes with insert. From the insert: "Makoto Moroi, a famous japanese composer with rare talent, is engaged on applying the stereophonic space created by 4-channel system as a new medium to express his musical world.

Two pieces recorded on this disc present Moroi's space music based on japanese national instruments.
1. Sinfonia "SHIN" (Elongation) for S.M. (Susumu Miyashita) consists of five parts and one coda where the composer freely uses the complicated combination of two 30-sting kotos created by Shuretsu Miyashita, Susumu Miyashita's father, three 13-sting kotos (usual type), gongs and other several kinds of percussion instruments, indian flutes Bansuries and the modulated human voice. The thought of this work is based on Arving Tofler's "Future Shock". Here it is expressed by the diversity of the players and the sound space and movement created by the multi-channel reproducing based on the electronics. The premiere has been accomplished by Susumu Miyashita at his recital in the Little Hall of Tokyo Bunka Kaikan on November 1, 1972.
Susumu Miyashita won the Grand Prix of Art Festival 1972 held by Japanese Government by this successful recital.
2. Trio "Ui-Tempen" (Eternal Change) has been especially composed for the 4-channel system CD-4 of Victor Company of Japan, Ltd. at the request of Victor Musical Industries, Inc.
Three players with Shakuhachi (bamboo clarinet), Koto and percussion instruments (several kinds of drums and others) create a musical mode by sound field change resulted from their positions or movement, and tension and relax due to self-assertion of each individual player.
So the mentioned pieces can be regarded as a creative work based on cooperation of a composer and a recording group."

Location: Victor Studio, Tokyo in Dec. 1972 & June 1973.
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